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‘I’m new to this world… it helps to work with someone who’s not!’

Jennifer Thornhill Verma knew the story she wanted to tell: a book that “shared the struggles and successes of Newfoundlanders, including my own family” during and after the life-altering, community-changing cod moratorium. In 1992, Ottawa closed down that iconic fishery, costing 30,000 Newfoundland fishers their livelihoods and threatening a community connection to a nearly 400-year tradition.

King’s MFA names two new writing mentors

The University of King’s College Master of Fine Arts in Creative Nonfiction program is pleased to announce the addition of two more award-winning writers and experienced writing teachers to its roster of mentors.

Halifax MFA Meet and Greet February 20

King’s Master of Fine Arts in in Creative Nonfiction may be still relatively new, but 13 of our students and graduates already have book contracts! And there are more to come.

MFA Meet and Greet set for Toronto November 27

King’s Master of Fine Arts in in Creative Nonfiction may be still relatively new, but 10 of our graduates already have book contracts! And there are more to come.

Renée Pellerin: from ‘have to write a book’ to publishing deal

In February 2014, veteran CBC journalist Renée Pellerin led a team of national health reporters covering the release of a report by Canadian researchers. It showed mammography screening “resulted in a high rate of over-diagnosis.” Pellerin wasn’t surprised. In the 1990s, she’d produced a CBC Marketplace documentary, which made a similar point: “the evidence that screening saved lives was weak.”

‘Let the story take you where it wants to lead’

Jason Murray (MFA 2016) had already written one novel and a book of poetry through another college writing program, but he was keen to explore nonfiction — and to get published.

Lauren McKeon answers her question: how the heck does anyone write a book?

It was the spring of 2014, and Lauren McKeon — award-winning freelance writer and editor of This Magazine — was “stuck in bed with a broken leg.” She had time to think.

Aaron Williams chases smoke, creates a ‘gritty’ memoir

“At first I’m calm as the trees fall. But suddenly a rat’s nest of wood, bent horizontal and cribbed into the trees above us, comes down in a rush of a hundred machine gun snaps. Trees caught in the nest flail around before hitting the ground. Our eyes dart everywhere, trying to keep track of every moment. Trees break free and swing themselves like catapults. Splintered chunks of wood slash through the air like propellers… Falling trees is the most dangerous job in North America.”